Our history

Granavolden Guesthouse is situated on a hill in the distinctive landscape of Hadeland. It is about an hour’s drive from Oslo or a 50 minute drive from Oslo Airport, Gardermoen. From the centre of Gran the road winds towards the horizon and after seven minutes you will reach us. 

A modern guesthouse within old walls 

In 2014 our guest house was completed after three years of major investment. Today, Granavolden is a modern guest house. The conference and meeting room have the facilities required for a successful meeting or an enjoyable seminar. The north building is now in use and houses the new reception and kitchen and the second floor has six new double rooms with en suite bathrooms. Granavolden has preserved its uniqueness and our guests have larger rooms at their disposal, including a completely new, large dining room with direct access to the yard. The cosy red Gregers' room has been refurbished and the outdoor area has new flower beds and berry bushes. The links back to the guest house as the main attraction at the sister churches has been strengthened.  

Room for variety

  • Today our guest house has 45 rooms of varying standards and sizes, with 74 beds in total.
  • 12 double rooms with en suite bathrooms, one room with bunk beds and an en suite bathroom
  • 15 single rooms with en suite bathrooms
  •  5 renovated double rooms and 3 renovated single rooms have bathrooms in the hall, while 
  •  9 double rooms are economy rooms with 2 beds in each room.

The fluffy bathrobes make it easy to get out of bed to go to the bathroom in the hall.    

The new double rooms in the north building have been named after well known local historical figures.  

Historical highlight at Granavollen

There has been a guest house at Granavolden since 1657. The place was a hub in ancient times. The churches were located here. There was a local court, a posting station and, not least, a guest house providing overnight accommodation, food and drink. The main road to Bergen brought all sorts of travellers to Granavøll. In 1716 the place became known outside its own borders when the District Sheriff and innkeeper, Gregers Granavolden (1677-1746), mobilised 50 men from Hadeland to fight a large troop of Swedish soldiers on horseback. The Battles of Harestuskogen were of great significance in the Great Northern War. As thanks for his heroic efforts, Gregors was granted a lifelong innkeeper’s licence for himself and his posterity, by King Frederick IV himself.

In April 1814 the guest house opened its doors to five delegates from Hordaland bound for the National Assembly at Eidsvoll. In the spring thaw they had taken the ice road over Randsfjorden. According to the story, they dried off and warmed up in the guest house. Later, Syver Gaarder started up a country store in the main building. It was a great success, which meant the buildings were improved and extended. He put his stamp on the main building to the south around 1850. 

Since summer holidays were for the common people in the 20th century, Hadeland became a holiday destination par excellence and the guest house became popular with its healthy inland climate at an altitude of 340 metres. In the 1950s, 60s and 70s a number of writers and cultural celebrities discovered Granavolden as a unique place to find inspiration and peace. Thor Heyerdahl was a permanent resident for several months. From his window in Gregers’ room, he found the peace to write about life on Easter Island in the Pacific, resulting in the publication of Aku-Aku in 1957.

This century, Granavolden Guesthousehas sharpened its profile and our guest house has become an excellent location for conferences, seminars and parties. As the owner, Opplysningsvesenets fond has a value platform and a vision which is about dedication, hospitality and authenticity.